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Organization Development: An Integrated Approach

Office of State Personnel, North Carolina

This model depicts three basic strategies to achieving successful organizational change. The three strategies are not mutually exclusive and all three could be used concurrently to bring about systemic change. One or the other, however, may be more conducive to the type of change needed in a particular organization. For this purpose, they are shown as being three different strategies.

The Behavioral Strategy takes an employee training and development approach. It posits that employee learning would bring about the organizational change needed. Learning would consist of gaining knowledge, skills and new attitudes, which would lead to new behaviors. These new behaviors would then lead to improved quality and performance

The Structural Strategy takes an organizational design approach. It posits that organization structure and design should be aligned (or realigned) consistent with the vision, direction, mission, or goals of the organization. The Structural Strategy would incorporate changes in the organization chart. Employees, units, divisions, and departments could be realigned to optimize resources. For example, hierarchies could be flattened and decision-making could be placed closer to the point of action. Significant work could be done in chartered, self-directed teams. Such realigned relationships would lead to improved quality and performance.

The Technical Strategy takes a continuous improvement approach. It posits that processes in the areas of customer focus, product and service delivery, support, and supplier and partnering could be improved. This strategy also maintains that technology be continuously updated and aligned with the processes of production and service to make work more efficient and effective. Continuous process improvement with aligned technology would lead to improved quality and performance.